How Long Can Orange Juice Sit Out

Orange juice can sit out for 2 hours before it goes bad, the drink is usually acidic and when exposed to room temperature for long hours, it produces lactic acid organisms. Lactic acid bacteria are a group of micro-organisms used in the fermentation of food. And once they grow in your orange juice they will influence its taste and texture.

The 2 hours spoilage timeline applies to the shelf-stable pasteurized orange juices, fresh and bottled orange juices. Orange juice is very nutritious, for one it will furnish your body with antioxidants. Even better is that the pulp of the citrus juice contains flavonoids that have myriad health benefits to the body, and you can also expect to be supplied with thiamin, folate, and potassium.

Apart from being nutritious, the juice is also sweet and refreshing to drink under the hot summer sun. However, if you are to enjoy its full benefits, you must ensure to take it before the sell-by date or when it has been freshly squeezed.

How long can orange juice keep fresh in the refrigerator?

The maximum you can keep your freshly squeezed orange juice is 3 days in the fridge, important to note is that storing it in the fridge is not a guarantee that it won’t go bad. A refrigerator that is packed with other foods and large containers might not encourage freshness because of the heat generated. Additionally, the fridge will be forced to work double to provide for all containers, and which could lead to the generation of heat.

To be on the safe side, it would be best to immediately drink your fresh orange juice or get the pasteurized orange juice that can stay fresh five days after the sell-by date, but if it has not been opened. Once you open it, you have up to 7 days to drink it before it becomes unfit for consumption.

Summary table of the preferred storage for the orange juice

Condition of the orange juice
Fridge
Pantry
Freezer
Fresh orange juice
2-3 days
N/A
3 to 4 months
Refrigerated orange juice (opened)
7 days
2 hours (at room temperature)
8 to 12 months or more
Refrigerated orange juice (unopened)
Sell by +3 to 5 days
N/A
8 to 12 months

How to keep your fresh orange juice fresh in the refrigerator

Fresh orange juice does have a very short life span, but storing it in the freezer can buy you some more time. Under normal circumstances, you would keep your orange juice in a tightly sealed container for not more than 3 days. But if you have a freezer, you can use the ice cube tray and freeze your juice, then transfer the cubes into a zip bag.

Storing your orange juice in the freezer will give you a solid 3 to 4 months. And even better is that you will have options when it comes to consuming the orange juice, so you can either defrost it into a liquid or take it frozen.

How can you tell that orange juice has gone bad?

There are three signs to look out for if you want to know if your orange juice has gone bad. Check the color of the orange juice, on most occasions, it will turn darker in color but don’t be deceived into thinking that it is fit for consumption. You could also try to smell it, and if you perceive a repugnant smell, more like alcohol or vinegar then you know that it has gone bad.

Another obvious sign that will help you determine if your orange juice has gone bad is the size of the bottle. Once the juice is spoilt, the microorganisms that form inside it release gases that will make the bottle swell up, and which is a clear indication that your juice has gone bad.

What will happen if I drink old orange juice?

Old orange juice or expired orange juice is harmful and should be tossed away. Many people assume that because their bodies play host to trillions of microbes that don’t harm them, they can get away with drinking old orange juice. Our bodies do harbor microbes it is correct, but which help protect the body against infections, while others help with the digestion of food.

Microorganisms are in different types, and the ones found in the orange juice will bring harm to your body. Individuals with a compromised immune system are at greater risk, including pregnant women. Ideally, the above category of individuals should only consume orange juice that has been Pasteurized or one that has been freshly squeezed.

Old orange juice will make you sick, for example in severe cases the individual might feel dizzy, develop a high fever, or experience difficulties in breathing. Consuming expired orange juice also encourages, vomiting, diarrhea, upset stomach, and nausea, all the above conditions can be costly to treat, and it is, therefore, better to refrain from drinking old or expired orange juice.

Which is the best temperature to store your orange juice

Fruit juices such as orange juice are loved because of their flavor and the fact that they are a source of minerals, vitamins, insoluble and soluble fibers. Given the increased use oranges, their production increased and many people who run their farms are into deriving the natural benefits of the fruit.

If you are among this group of people and are wondering what the right storage temperature is, you are in the right place. According to the Food Drug and Administration body, responsible for public health, orange juice should be stored at temperatures below 41 ̊F (5 ̊C). If you have canned orange fruit juices, you can store them in a cool dry place below 85 ̊F.

FAQ’s

Will my orange juice go bad if not refrigerated?

Yes, your orange juice will go bad if not refrigerated and will even lose its taste.

Can I leave my orange juice out overnight?

No, you cannot leave your orange juice out overnight because it will go bad. Perishable foods can only be left out for 2 hours at room temperature.

Conclusion

How you handle your orange when making the orange juice, will very much determine its shelf life. If you will be blending ensure to wash them in warm soapy water, thoroughly rinse and sanitize them in bleach water. Your blender should also be thoroughly cleaned and sanitized if you want to enjoy a fresh and safe orange juice treat. If you find the above processes hectic just get yourself pasteurized orange juice, and drink it within the recommended time.

Philip Smith is a certified appliance technician, his extensive knowledge on the use and care of home appliances has been cemented with the many years he has spent as a home service professional. Philip is on a mission to create awareness of the various types of kitchen appliances. Effectively arming individuals with information that they can use as they comb the markets for both the commercial and home use blenders. Some of the extensively researched information can be found at Blenderjournal.com. Philip spends most of his free time researching the various home appliances and a good chunk of his time is dedicated to servicing appliances.

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